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Grade 12 Course Descriptions


    • Art 40S is a project-based course. Students will be encouraged to explore various media to develop and refine their personal artistic style. Themes include art history, art appreciation, and the importance of art in society. Students will be expected to participate in field trips to various galleries. Students intending to enter a post-secondary art based program will have the opportunity to work on formal portfolio projects.

    • This course presents students with a survey of the diversity of living things and the nature of their interactions. Broad themes to be covered include evolution, and the transmission, expression, and technological applications of genes. Emphasis will be placed on the historical and social impact of biology and biotechnology, and upon the connectedness of life science with other disciplines.

      Objectives

      ●     To increase student awareness and understanding of basic biological concepts in selected topics, as listed in the course outline.
      ●     To enable the student to develop and apply the skills of scientific methods and research.
      ●     To promote scientific literacy and interdisciplinary thought.
      ●     To promote an understanding of the relationship between biology and technology, and their impact upon the individual, society, and the environment.

      Prerequisites

      Although there are no prerequisites for the course, the completion of Biology 30S and/or Chemistry 30S would provide the student with significant advantages.

      Course Outline

      Part I Genetics
      ●     Understanding biological inheritance
      ●     Mechanisms of inheritance

      Part II Biodiversity
      ●     Evolutionary theory and biodiversity
      ●     Organizing biodiversity
      ●     Conservation of biodiversity

      Assignments

      Course activities include lectures, reading assignments, class discussions, independent research, group projects, problem solving, video, multimedia presentations, and use of the Internet and web-based learning communities.

      Benefits

      This course provides a sound foundation for future courses and careers related to biology, and serves to increase awareness of the living world around us. A background in biology is especially useful for those seeking careers in medicine, nursing, physiotherapy, dentistry, pharmacy, laboratory technology, and other science-related disciplines.

    • Chemistry 40S is a continuation and enhancement of the Chemistry 30S course, ideal for students who intend to take science courses in university or other post-secondary institutions.

      Objectives

      The objective of the course is to have students develop and demonstrate their understanding of chemical concepts. Students will have an opportunity to engage in practical and inquiry-based activities. The goal of the course is for students to see the relationships and patterns in the reactivity of substances.

      Prerequisites

      Chemistry 30S (It is recommended that students taking this course have a final mark of at least 70% in the prerequisite.)

      Topics

      ●    Aqueous reactions
      ●    Atomic structure
      ●    Kinetics
      ●    Equilibrium
      ●    Acids and bases
      ●    Electrochemistry

      Assignments

      Term marks will be based on tests, quizzes, laboratory work, and projects.

      Benefits

      A background in chemistry is especially useful for those seeking careers in dentistry, engineering, laboratory technology, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, physiotherapy, and other science-related disciplines.

    • Computer Science 40S (CS40S) is an advanced course in computer science. It is designed to prepare students for post secondary computer science studies. Students will apply the skills that they have developed in CS20S and CS30S to complete a large year-long software development project. Students will be responsible for every phase of the development of a finished product, from the initial concept to the final roll out.

      In CS40S students will choose the programming environment, Java, Swift, C++, Python, etc., that they will use to develop their software project. A variety of topics in computer science will be covered and students will be expected to apply the concepts covered in these topics to their project and to smaller programming activities.

      The focus of this course will continue to be on Object Oriented Design and its application in the development of applications that use graphic interface. Students will be expected to apply what they have learned in CS20S and CS30S as well as develop new skills as required for their specific project.

      Prerequisites

      CS30S, or instructor approval, strong problem solving and math skills as well as the ability to work independently.

    • Advanced Debate and Advocacy 41G is designed to further instruct students in the art of rhetoric and the varying conventions of many traditional styles of debate, and to fine-tune skills necessary to become strong advocates for causes that they wish to support.

      Topics

      ●     Detailed history of rhetoric and its major theorists
      ●     Commonly used debating devices
      ●     Styles of debates
      ●     Debate formats
      ●     Research for debate preparation
      ●     Adopting and changing beliefs in society
      ●     Activism

      Assignments

      Students will engage in a wide variety of assignments including conducting research, entering speech and debate tournaments, and supporting recognized and appropriate political, social, special interest or advocacy groups.

      Prerequisites

      Debate and Critical Thinking 31G

    • The main emphasis of Drama is performance and the ability to work successfully as a member of a dramatic troupe. The class will work on a production chosen to build the dynamics of the class and to challenge and build acting skills of individuals.

      Objectives

      Students will learn how theatre is developed into a communicative art form, though active participation in at least two productions, as well as through partnered scene-work and individual monologue work.  One production will use collective theatre techniques, where students create, develop, and rehearse their own dramatic presentation. 

      Prerequisites

      Students must have completed Dramatic Arts 30S  or the equivalent.     

      Topics

      The content and structure of each production will be chosen to reflect students’ interests and abilities and to extend acting techniques through practical experience.  The course will emphasize characterization, scene analysis, script interpretation, stage-blocking, rehearsal techniques, and communication with an audience.  Interested students will be allowed to experiment with production aspects such as make-up, costume, stage management, house management, and promotion.

      Assignments

      Commitment and willingness to work towards the production goals of this course are necessary, therefore 100% attendance is required.  Students’ progress will be assessed on individual contributions, participation, and skills development.  Significant additional time will be required for rehearsal and presentation during the last weeks of March.

      Benefits

      This course continues to develop students’ creative theatrical abilities, critical analysis skills, collaborative decision-making skills, as well as the ability to use voices and physical bodies to communicate meaning in a dramatic and artistic form.  Students who are interested in pursuing careers in education, the arts, communication, professional theatre or any field requiring presentations will find this course beneficial.

      Special Requirements

      Students will be expected to dress in a manner appropriate to class activities. Specific requirements will be announced in the first class.

    • Economics 40S will provide an introduction to the principles of economics. It will show the ways in which economics is a part of daily life through examinations of individual, corporate and governmental decision-making. It will include economic models, methodology, and indicators of economic performance. The course will focus on current economic issues, be they national or international is scope. Material will be delivered in a lecture- and discussion-based format.

      Topics

      ●    Core economic concepts
      ●    Supply and demand
      ●    Capitalism and socialism
      ●    Efficiency and competition
      ●    Production and costs
      ●    Market structures
      ●    Measures of economic activity
      ●    National fiscal/monetary priorities
      ●    Canada in the Global Economy

      Assignments

      Assignments vary from year to year, and are intended to provide students with opportunities to critically examine the information discussed in class. There will be a variety of assignments that may include reports, presentations and essays. There will also be unit tests and term exams.

    • This course provides opportunities for students to use, analyze, and compose a wide range of both pragmatic (practical) texts and aesthetic texts (language that creates an imagined reality).  Students will learn to express themselves clearly, effectively, and extensively as they communicate for various audiences.  As listeners, they will identify, recall and respond to information gathered through authentic English-speaking conversations.  Students will learn basic reading strategies that will allow them to comprehend, analyze and reflect on a variety of texts. This course will expand on the students’ knowledge of English grammatical structures and essay construction.

      Learning Outcomes

      Students will:
      ●    Explore thoughts, ideas, feeling, and experiences and express them clearly
      ●    Comprehend a selection of literary forms and apply the skills of critical response through analysis and interpretation
      ●    Explore a wide variety of texts and forms of communication
      ●    Respond personally and critically to oral, print, and other media texts
      ●    Enhance their ability to communicate clearly, effectively, and accurately
      ●    Understand and apply the writing conventions used in our academic settings

      Assignments

      Students will complete a wide variety of thematic readings from a selection of memoirs, short stories, poetry, articles, and a Shakespearean play. Students will also complete a variety of writing assignments such as responses, summaries, journals and essays.

      Requirements

      Students must have the necessary prerequisites from their home country and/or demonstrate their language competence through a written test.

    • Literary Focus 40S is the required English course for graduation and the foundation of the electives.

      Students must demonstrate effective academic writing skills, speech, reading, and comprehension skills through analysis, synthesis, and discussion of course content. This will form the basis of the course evaluation. Literature is studied through a variety of forms – short stories, novels, plays, poetry, and nonfiction. Course content is a balance of Canadian, world, and historic sources.

      Assignments

      Assignments include in-class responses, formal presentations, academic essays, and other forms of response to literature and related issues.

      Benefits

      The basic life skills of research, organization, knowledge of form and audience, and working within deadlines are the foundation for success in electives as well as post secondary study.

    • Transactional Focus emphasizes the pragmatic or practical uses of language. Informing, directing, persuading, analyzing, arguing, and explaining are the major tools used to gain information or discern another point of view, to compare and weigh ideas, and to conduct daily transactions.

      Students will be required to participate in a variety of learning activities and assignments that will help them to explore various forms of communication.

      Objectives

      Students will experience a variety of learning techniques to help them acquire and demonstrate satisfactory skills in a number of related areas outlined in the provincial curriculum documents. Students will read, write, listen, speak, view, and represent to accomplish the following goals:

      ●    To explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences
      ●    To comprehend and respond personally and critically to oral, print, and other media texts
      ●    To manage ideas and information
      ●    To enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
      ●    To celebrate and build community

      Assignments

      Oral presentations, group discussions, summary writing, note-taking, research, visual representing, reports, process analysis, letter writing, educational portfolios, university application essays, and expository and persuasive essays are all included in this course. The writing process will be reviewed through a number of writing assignments that will address particular needs of EAL students.

      Requirements

      Students must have the necessary prerequisites from their home country and/or demonstrate their language competence through a written test.

    • In the Family Studies course students will examine roles and relationships in families and the way families are created and function within the context of the broader society.

      Objectives

      Students will gain an understanding of the family as a social unit and the development of individuals within a family setting.

      Topics

      Students will gain a comprehensive background in a variety of topics, including:
      ●    Self-concept
      ●    Education and selection of a vocation
      ●    The family life cycle
      ●    Family planning, pregnancy and childbirth
      ●    Human sexual reproduction
      ●    Child and adolescent development
      ●    Family violence and abuse
      ●    Dating, cohabitation and marriage
      ●    Mate selection theories
      ●    Separation and divorce
      ●    The impact of addictions on families
      ●    Introduction to family therapy
      ●    Aging, death, and grieving

      Assignments

      This course places a high degree of emphasis on combining theory with personal expression. This takes the form of in-class participation in discussion and debates. Students are expected to think critically and to write reflective responses on a wide variety of topics connected to family life. In addition to written work, in-class tests will be given periodically to assess student knowledge of relevant facts and theoretical concepts.

      Benefits

      Family Studies 40S provides students with a greater understanding of themselves, both as individuals and as members of their respective family systems. It serves as a social foundation for continued study in the Humanities, in Social Work, Psychology and Sociology, and in helping professions such as Medicine and Education. In addition, the course helps prepare students for future relationships, parenting, and other life challenges.

    • Ce cours est destiné aux francophones et aux étudiants du programme d’immersion qui veulent approfondir leur connaissance de la langue et la littérature françaises.

      Les buts du cours

      Ce cours permettra à l’élève de perfectionner son expression orale et écrite. Il / elle sera amené/e à développer ses habiletés langagières par l’étude de la grammaire, de la littérature et des textes non-littéraires.

      Le cours préalable

      Le cours de Français 30S est le cours préalable normal.

      Les sujets à l’étude

      Ce cours a pour but de perfectionner et d’approfondir les connaissances grammaticales acquises au cours des années précédentes. Par le biais de romans, de films, de pièces de théâtre, de nouvelles, de poésie et d’une variété de textes non-littéraires, l’élève développera son esprit de synthèse et d’analyse.
      Les élèves verront des  spectacles de musique, des pièces de théâtre et des films français au cours de l'année. Ces activités leur permettront de vivre la culture et d'approfondir leurs connaissances tout en suivant le programme d'études.

      Les devoirs

      Afin de perfectionner l’écrit, l’élève fera des dictées, des exercices de grammaire et des rédactions. Pour améliorer son expression orale, il / elle devra participer aux discussions en classe, présenter des scènes ou des monologues dramatiques et faire des présentations orales sur les textes littéraires et non-littéraires à l’étude.

    • French 40S is part of the Core French (Français de base) program beginning in grade 4. This program integrates four components—experience/communication, culture, language, and general language education—so that learners are able to apply practical linguistic knowledge at a personal level. French plays, concerts and films will be integrated into the curricula to help students experience language and culture more deeply.

      Objectives

      ●    To improve French language skills
      ●    To increase linguistic accuracy
      ●    To expand language learning strategies
      ●    To better understand Canadian and international French language speaking cultures

      Prerequisites

      French 30S

      Assignments

      Students are evaluated on the development of their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Assignments include workbook exercises, research, problem-solving activities, interviews, projects, presentations, and role-playing.

      Benefits

      Research shows that second-language students develop greater problem-solving skills, perform better in their native language, and become more open to other cultures. This course is taught almost entirely in French. Students must be willing to participate, be resourceful, take risks, and feel frustrated - all essential aspects of acquiring a second language.

    • This course has a student-led content from a wide variety of potential topics and subjects. They are all based on the principles of active democratic citizenship, ecological literacy, critical media literacy, and ethical decision-making. The course consolidates learning across disciplines to empower students as agents of change for a sustainable and equitable future. One component of this course is the planning and implementation of a community-based action research project.

      Prerequisites

      Successful completion of Grade 11 History or approval from the Instructor.

      Topics

      ●    The role of media
      ●    Consumerism
      ●    Environment
      ●    Poverty, wealth and power
      ●    Indigenous peoples
      ●    Peace and conflict
      ●    Oppression and genocide
      ●    Health and biotechnology
      ●    Gender and identity
      ●    Social justice and human rights

      Assignments

      Participation in class discussions, activities and seminars is a major component of the term mark. Other assignments include presentations, article seminars, documentary reviews, map tests, developing a segment for radio and reflecting on your peers’ work. In lieu of an exam, students will develop a community based action research project. The goal of the project is to take learning from the theoretical to the experiential and make a difference in the students’ lives and their communities.

      Benefits

      When we study global issues we become more effective and enlightened citizens of communities, and of the world.   Because of its interdisciplinary approach, Global Issues provides useful background for university courses in economics, political science, women’s studies, history, geography, philosophy, and international development.

    • History 40S - Western Civilization examines the origins and developments of Modern Western Civilization, tracing the story from approximately 1500 right into the 20th century. This course surveys the major movements and movers that have shaped the Western World over the past 500 years.

      Objectives

      At the end of the course, students should have knowledge of the political, social, religious, and economic institutions and ideas that have developed over the Modern Age. Students should have an understanding of the method of history, including such topics as the problem of causation in history, and the impact of the individual in shaping historical events. Students should develop their researching and essay-writing skills.

      Topics

      ●    The origins of Western Civilization (WC) can be traced back to the Middle Ages, thus History 40S-WC begins with a survey of medieval Europe, concentrating on the predominant institution of the day, the Roman Catholic Church.
      ●    In the 16th century, the Church experienced a major upheaval known as the Reformation. The course examines the fragmentation of Western Christendom and the profound changes created by this religious upheaval.
      ●    In the 17th and 18th centuries, Europe was shaken by a series of political revolutions. This course examines the origins, developments, and repercussions of one of these upheavals — the French Revolution.
      ●    Over the 19th century, the Industrial Revolution took hold in Britain and then spread to the rest of the western world. This course examines the drastic changes that came with industrialization.
      ●    Our political, economic, and social systems, indeed even our attitudes, have been drastically altered by the major phenomena of the 20th century world war. This course focuses on the experience of World War I.

      Assignments

      Students will do a number of in-class assignments involving analysis of original sources. Students will complete at least two formal research essays over the course. In addition to the regularly scheduled exams, students can expect occasional tests.

      Benefits

      Although not a prerequisite, History 40S - WC provides a good background for study in any of the Humanities at the university level - English, Philosophy, and History.

      Prerequisites

      Successful completion of History 30F or permission of the Dean.

    • This course is an introduction to Canadian Law and the legal system in Canada. We will examine how parliament, policing, and the judiciary intersect, and how the average Canadian interacts with all three.

      Objectives

      At the end of the course the student should have some basic knowledge about the legal system in Canada and various aspects of law.

      Topics

      ●    The legal system
      ●    The Charter of Rights and Freedoms
      ●    Criminal law
      ●    Torts law
      ●    Family law
      ●    Electoral process

      Assignments

      Term marks are based on homework assignments, tests and presentations. Students should be prepared to participate in class discussion. Occasionally, we may have field trips to various law-related sites instead of class.

      Prerequisites

      None

    • Grade 12 Applied Mathematics (40S) is intended for students considering post-secondary studies that do not require a study of theoretical calculus. The course is context driven and promotes the learning of numerical and geometrical problem-solving techniques as they are related to the world around us.

      The primary goals of Applied Mathematics are to assist students to develop critical–thinking skills through problem solving and through making mathematical predictions based on real-world models. These goals may be attained in a number of ways. Students may collect data in experiments and activities and then develop mathematical concepts by analyzing that data. Students are encouraged to learn and demonstrate effective communication skills through a variety of media, and are expected to become proficient in both oral and written communication skills.

      Topics

      ●    Sinusoidal functions
      ●    Compound interest
      ●    Probability
      ●    Polynomial functions
      ●    Permutations and combinations
      ●    Investments
      ●    Design and measurement
      ●    Research project
      ●    Exponential and logarithmic functions

      Prerequisite

      Mathematics 30S Applied (preferred) or Mathematics 30S Pre-Calculus

      Special Requirement

      A graphics calculator is mandatory for any Applied course. It is recommended that students purchase a Texas Instrument TI-83 or TI-83 Plus.

      NOTE: University faculties and technology programs have different entrance requirements (either 40S Pre-Calculus and/or 40S Applied). Please check with a Dean, or the specific faculty in which you are interested to ensure the proper entrance qualifications.

    • This course is intended for students whose post-secondary planning does not include a focus on mathematics and science-related fields. Grade 12 Essential Mathematics (40S) is a one-credit course emphasizing consumer applications, problem solving, decision making, and spatial sense. Course work includes investigations, projects and presentations dealing with mathematics in everyday living. The course is accepted for general admission to universities and colleges.

      Topics

      ●    Home finance
      ●    Vehicle finance
      ●    Probability
      ●    Precision measurement
      ●    Career life
      ●    Statistics – a world of information
      ●    Geometry and trigonometry
      ●    Business finance

      Assignments

      Term marks will be based on homework assignments, quizzes, term tests, and projects.

      Prerequisite

      Grade 11 Mathematics

      Special requirements

      A scientific calculator is mandatory for the course.

    • Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S is a very demanding and fast-paced course designed for students who intend to study calculus at a post-secondary institution. The content of the course focuses on abstract numerical concepts and places an emphasis on cumulative testing, mental mathematics, and higher level problem solving.

      Prerequisites

      Pre-Calculus Mathematics 30S. (It is recommended that students taking this course have a final mark of at least 70% in the prerequisite).

      Topics

      ●    Circular functions
      ●    Transformations
      ●    Trigonometric identities
      ●    Exponents and logarithms
      ●    Permutations, combinations, binomial theorem
      ●    Radical, rational, and polynomial functions

      Evaluation

      There will be daily assignments given for homework; to be successful a student must take the time to complete these assignments. Term marks, however, may be based on the result of assignments, quizzes, projects and tests. Students will also write a mid-term (December) and final examination (April).

      Note: University faculties and technology programs have different entrance requirements (either Pre-Calculus 40S and/or Applied 40S). Please check with a Dean, or the specific faculty in which you are interested to ensure the proper entrance qualifications.

    • This course will take the students to their highest level of achievement in their high school instrumental music program. The high level performance sees less time spent on individual technique and more on ensemble development and the study of some of the finest concert band literature. Students will participate in a variety of school concerts, festivals and other special events. Performance dress is required.

      Prerequisite

      Band 30S or permission of the instructor.

    • In this course, students will have the opportunity to develop their musical interests and abilities through participation in a choral program with heavy emphasis on performance of choral music. The general objective of the program is to enable students to gain, through performance, an understanding of a wide range of choral literature. Students will acquire singing skills including vocal production, breath control, diction and phrasing. Attention will be given to ensemble skills involving listening, voice blending, and the discipline necessary for choral singing. Students will be expected to participate in rehearsals, concerts, recitals, festivals, and other performances outside of regular class hours. Performance dress is required.

      Prerequisite

      Music Choral 30S or permission of the instructor.

    • This compulsory full-credit course is designed to help students take greater ownership of their own physical fitness, to encourage them to seek out activities that interest them, and to engage in active lifestyles into their future. Students will be exposed to a variety of topics such as nutrition, mental health, substance abuse and fitness management. These topics will make up one third of the course content.

      Students will also be required to attend a variety of activities throughout the year, exposing them to various fitness experiences. This will make up one third of  the course.

      Finally, the students will be required to develop and implement the personal activity portion of the course on their own time via a personal physical activity plan. Students will be introduced to safety and risk management planning to minimize the associated risks of the activities they have chosen. This will make up the final third of the course content.

      Students will be graded for completion of the course with a Complete or Incomplete designation.

      NOTE: Parents/guardians will be required to review students’ physical activity plan and sign a Parent Declaration and Consent Form acknowledging their approval of the chosen activities and acceptance of the responsibility for risk management, safety, and supervision. Parents/guardians will also be required to verify the entries of students’ physical activity log through a sign-off procedure.

    • Physics is the study of the principles governing the physical world. It deals with the causes, effects, and relationships of natural physical phenomena. The concepts that emerge are normally expressed in mathematical language and are used to predict natural physical phenomena which in turn are the subject of experimental verification.

      Objectives

      The Physics 40S course is designed to give students an introduction to fundamental topics in physics. As well, a lab centred approach, including the use of real time and interactive computing, is used to help students relate scientific concepts to the real world.

      Prerequisites

      Completion of Physics 30S as described above (In exceptional circumstances students may be permitted to enroll in Physics 40S without having completed Physics 30S. Permission of the instructor is required.) Well-developed mathematical skills would be an asset. Applied or Pre-Calculus Mathematics 40S is the co-requisite for Physics 40S.

      Topics

      Topic 1: Mechanics
      ●    Topic 1.1: Kinematics
      ●    Topic 1.2: Dynamics
      ●    Topic 1.3: Momentum
      ●    Topic 1.4: Projectile motion
      ●    Topic 1.5: Circular motion
      ●    Topic 1.6: Work and energy

      Topic 2: Fields
      ●    Topic 2.1: Exploration of space
      ●    Topic 2.2: Low Earth Orbit
      ●    Topic 2.3: Electric and Magnetic Fields

      Topic 3: Electricity
      ●    Topic 3.1: Electric circuits
      ●    Topic 3.2: Electromagnetic induction

      Topic 4: Medical Physics
      ●    Topic 4.1: Medical Physics

      Assignments

      Students will be assigned questions from the textbook, provided with additional exercises, and expected to perform a number of laboratory exercises to verify certain principles of physics.

      Benefits

      Physics helps students understand the world in which they live. Many skills acquired studying physics can be applied to studies of other subjects. Observing, measuring, analyzing, inferring, and reporting can be transferred to many of the things we do in our lives.

      Physics 40S is one of the prerequisites for a number of post-secondary programs, including pre-Medicine; pre-Dentistry; Engineering, Environmental Studies (pre-Architecture), Pharmacy, and various technical certificates.

    • This course serves as an introduction to the field of psychology, and as a preparation for further studies in the social and behavioural sciences.

      Objectives

      ●    To promote a better understanding of the self and of others
      ●    To increase student awareness and understanding of basic psychological concepts in selected topics
      ●    To enable the student to develop skills in and to apply various psychological research methods
      ●    To promote scientific literacy and interdisciplinary thought
      ●    To establish and develop skills such as problem-solving and critical thinking
      ●    To gain knowledge of the various careers and educational opportunities associated with psychology, and to be able to make informed decisions about pursuing further study
      ●    To work together with the instructor and other students in a cooperative learning environment

       Topics

      ●    An introduction to the Science of Psychology
      ●    The Nervous System, sensation, and perception
      ●    Consciousness, sleep and dreams, psychotropic drugs
      ●    Learning, attention, and memory
      ●    Intelligence, thought, and language
      ●    Motivation and emotion
      ●    Developmental Psychology
      ●    Theories of Personality
      ●    Psychopathology and its treatment
      ●    Health, stress, and coping

      Assignments

      Course activities include reading and writing assignments, class discussion, independent research, independent research, projects, tests, videos, interactive demonstrations, and multimedia presentations.

      Benefits

      The course provides a sound foundation for future courses and careers related to psychology and serves to increase awareness of the self and of others. A background in psychology is especially useful for those seeking careers in the various sub-fields of psychology, medicine, education, social work, and other human-centred disciplines.

    • Spanish 40S is the final year of the three-year program at the high-school level. This advanced course allows students to engage in a number of interactive exercises, as well as in selected readings from a number of Spanish authors and text sources. The course provides students, as well, with the opportunity to expand their knowledge of Spanish language, culture, and people. This course prepares students to enter university level Spanish courses. Students are evaluated on the development of their ability to speak, understand, read, and write Spanish at an intermediate-advanced level.

      After the completion of Spanish 40S, students will have the opportunity to participate in an exchange program with a school in Lima, Peru.

      Objectives

      ●    To improve and refine Spanish language skills to be used in a variety of situations and for a variety of purposes
      ●    To use Spanish effectively and competently at an intermediate-advanced level
      ●    To maximize the effectiveness of language learning strategies
      ●    To build on the knowledge of the diversity of Spain and Spanish American culture

      Prerequisites

      Spanish 30S (from a three-year program) or Spanish 20F (from a four-year program)

      Topics

      ●    Knowing yourself and relationships
      ●    World of the future and the environment
      ●    Healthy mind in healthy body
      ●    Cultural diversity in Spanish speaking countries / Migration
      ●    Cultural celebrations and famous people from the Spanish world
      ●    The future: Choosing a career

      Assignments

      Exercises, research, interviews, oral presentations, problem-solving activities, role-playing, a novel, and four projects focused on the topics covered in class.

      Benefits

      There is significant evidence to suggest that learning another language enhances the use of the first language, promotes cognitive flexibility, creativity, and develops awareness and sensitivity to other cultures.

      Moreover, in today’s workplace, it is an asset to have the ability to communicate and interact effectively with different cultures.

    • This Young Artist Intensive is designed for the focused young musician wishing to further develop a higher level of physical, cognitive, and affective skill competency through lectures, workshops, one-on- one instruction, and recording projects.  This course will embrace the unique nature of music as a self-expressive art form and focus on connecting students to the world of professional music-making.

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